Posts for: April, 2018

WhyweNeedtoCareforaYoungerPatientsBoneafteraToothLoss

In an instant, an accident could leave you or a loved one with a missing tooth. Thankfully, we can restore it with a dental implant that looks and functions like a real tooth—and the sooner the better.

But if the patient is a teenager or younger, sooner may have to be later. Because their jaws are still developing, an implant placed now could eventually look as if it's sinking into the gums as the jaw continues to grow and the implant doesn't move. It's best to wait until full jaw maturity around early adulthood and in the meantime use a temporary replacement.

But that wait could pose a problem with bone health. As living tissue, bone cells have a life cycle where they form, function and then dissolve (resorption) with new cells taking their place. This cycle continues at a healthy rate thanks to stimulation from forces generated by the teeth during chewing that travel through the roots to the bone.

When a tooth goes missing, however, so does this stimulation. Without it the bone's growth cycle can slow to an unhealthy rate, ultimately reducing bone volume.  Because implants require a certain amount of bone for proper placement and support, this could make it difficult if not impossible to install one.

We can help prevent this by placing a bone graft immediately after the removal of a tooth within the tooth's "socket." The graft serves as a scaffold for new bone cells to form and grow upon. The graft will eventually resorb leaving the newly formed bone in its place.

We can also fine-tune and slow the graft's resorption rate. This may be preferable for a younger patient with years to go before their permanent restoration. In the meantime, you can still proceed with other dental treatments including orthodontics.

By carefully monitoring a young patient's bone health and other aspects of their dental care, we can keep on course for an eventual permanent restoration. With the advances in implantology, the final smile result will be worth the wait.

If you would like more information on dental care for trauma injuries, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants for Teenagers: Factors Influencing Treatment Planning in Adolescents.”


By Newmarket Dentistry
April 23, 2018
Category: Dental Care
Tags: oral hygiene  

Are you keeping good oral hygiene habits? A good oral hygiene routine includes daily brushing and flossing, as well as regular dental oral hygienecheckups. Dental checkups include an exam and a professional cleaning. The exam allows the dentist to look for signs of potential problems, such as tooth decay or gum disease, and treat them promptly before they worsen. The professional cleaning keeps your teeth and gums healthy. At Newmarket Dentistry, Dr. Richard Lee-Shanok is your Newmarket, ON, dentist for helping you establish good oral hygiene habits.

Good Oral Hygiene

Good oral hygiene habits keep your teeth and gums healthy and are important for preventing such problems as tooth decay and gum disease. A good oral hygiene routine includes daily brushing and flossing, as well as regular visits to your Newmarket dentist. In addition to brushing and flossing daily, there are several other habits you can incorporate into your oral hygiene routine to keep your mouth health.

Good oral hygiene habits include the following:

  • Brushing twice a day
  • Using a toothpaste containing fluoride
  • Brushing with a soft-bristled toothbrush
  • Flossing at least once a day
  • Using a fluoride rinse daily
  • Avoiding the use of tobacco products
  • Limiting consumption of sugary foods and drinks
  • Scheduling regular dental checkups

Proper Brushing

The importance of brushing the teeth twice daily with a fluoride containing tooth paste is well understood. However, it is important to brush your teeth properly. Being hasty or abrasive when brushing can cause problems. It is important to gently and thoroughly brush all sides of each tooth, as well as all surface areas inside the mouth. Poor brushing habits can leave cavity-causing bacteria behind. When brushing, use a soft-bristled toothbrush that comfortably fits in your mouth and gently brush all around each tooth, on the tongue, roof of the mouth, and gums.

Keeping good oral hygiene habits is important for maintaining a healthy mouth and preventing tooth decay, gum disease, and other oral health problems. Regular dental checkups are part of a good oral hygiene routine. To schedule your next checkup with Dr. Lee-Shanok, your Newmarket, ON, dentist, call Newmarket Dentistry at (905) 830-1010.


TeensBenefitMostfromATemporarySolutiontoMissingTeeth

While tooth loss can occur at any age, replacing one in a younger patient requires a different approach than for someone older. It’s actually better to hold off on a permanent restoration like a dental implant if the person is still in their teens.

This is because a teenager’s jaws won’t finish developing until after nineteen or in their early twenties. An implant set in the jawbone before then could end up out of alignment, making it appear out of place — and it also may not function properly. A temporary replacement improves form and function for now and leaves the door open for a permanent solution later.

The two most common choices for teens are a removable partial denture (RPD) or a bonded fixed bridge. RPDs consist of a plastic gum-colored base with an attached prosthetic (false) tooth matching the missing tooth’s type, shape and jaw position. Most dentists recommend an acrylic base for teens for its durability (although they should still be careful biting into something hard).

The fixed bridge option is not similar to one used commonly with adult teeth, as the adult version requires permanent alteration of the teeth on either side of the missing tooth to support the bridge. The version for teens, known as a “bonded” or “Maryland bridge,” uses tiny tabs of dental material bonded to the back of the false tooth with the extended portion then bonded to the back of the adjacent supporting teeth.

While bonded bridges don’t permanently alter healthy teeth, they also can’t withstand the same level of biting forces as a traditional bridge used for adults. The big drawback is if the bonding breaks free a new bonded bridge will likely be necessary with additional cost for the replacement.

The bridge option generally costs more than an RPD, but buys the most time and is most comfortable before installing a permanent restoration. Depending on your teen’s age and your financial ability, you may find it the most ideal — though not every teen is a good candidate. That will depend on how their bite, teeth-grinding habits or the health of surrounding gums might impact the bridge’s stability and durability.

A complete dental exam, then, is the first step toward determining which options are feasible. From there we can discuss the best choice that matches your teen’s long-term health, as well as your finances.

If you would like more information on tooth replacement solutions for younger patients, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.




Archive:

Tags

FacebookTwitterBlogGoogle Plus